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tekena:

A lion and a miniature sausage dog have formed an unlikely friendship after the little dog took the king of the jungle under his wing as a cub.
Bonedigger, a five-year old male lion, and Milo, a seven-year old Dachshund, are so close that Milo helps the lion clean his teeth after dinner.
The 500lbs lion dwarfs little Milo, yet after the dog took the disabled lion into his protection as a cub, Bonedigger has rarely left his side.

The two have been inseparable over the past five years at G.W. Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood, Oklahoma.
Bonedigger was born with a metabolic bone disease that left him mildly crippled.


He said: ‘This friendship between an 11 pound wiener dog and a 500 pound lion is the only of it’s kind in the world ever seen.’
Mr Reinke, who lost both his legs after a bungee jumping accident, added that the friendship between Bonedigger and his pack is unique.
‘He wouldn’t be so friendly with other dogs - it’s all down to them being pals since he was a cub. ‘
Milo often gives his best lion impression, copying Bonedigger’s ‘puffing’ - a deafening lion growl that can be heard over a mile away.
Wild lions use it to communicate with other prides in their natural environment.
‘Milo does his best to copy Bonedigger when the lion tries puffing to communicate with other lions in the park ,’ added John.
G.W. Exotic Animal Park has recently been affected by the deadly tornado that swept through Oklahoma on May 20th.
The park was damaged and flooded, but is still managing to provide shelter for domestic and wild creatures that are homeless because of the storm.

thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info
thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info
thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info
thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info
thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info
thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info
thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 
Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 
The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”
Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 
The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 
Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 
Zoom Info

thefrogman:

Hello Internet. I’ve missed you. 

Last Friday night St. Louis was ravaged by an incredible storm. I’ve lived here all my life and I cannot recall a more powerful display of severe weather. The sirens went off. The Emergency Broadcast System was NOT a test and it was followed by our local news. 

The entire news weather team had assembled. I think even that weekend guy that we never see was there. They all had a twinkle in their eye, as if this was the moment they had been training for their entire careers. They broke out all of their best amazing technicolor dream maps. A rainbow of colors fiercely swirling over the St. Louis area. The main weatherman stood in front of these swirls and started pointing furiously. “Do you see this red swirly bit!? That’s bad! If you are near this red swirly bit, you should try not to be near it anymore.”

Soon the storm was overhead. Lightning and thunder ensued. The lights went out. The internet was gone. Me, my family, and Otis were huddled in our basement illuminated by a tiny flashlight in the center of the room. Otis thought we wanted to play with him. Making sure no one was left out of his fun, he brought us all toys that we could throw for him. And we did. 

The next day we ventured out to review the damage. Our neighborhood was a mess. I can’t confirm that a tornado struck nearby, but the winds were powerful enough to snap telephone poles and uproot entire trees. Everyone in the area had broken branches scattered across their lawn. Others were not as lucky, as trees fell onto their houses and garages. 100,000 people without power and millions of dollars in damages. 

Amazingly these 100+mph winds only damaged things and not people. No one was seriously hurt. With the amount of destruction I saw that is hard to believe, but I am grateful for it. 

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